Johann Weiand in Lancaster County, PA.
Looking for a father for Georg Weiand, born 1745-50, and first found in Lancaster County as a single man in 1770.

From research by Justin Houser and John Wion.

The starting point for all of this is that the proven ancestor, George Weyand, certainly lived in Manor Township, Lancaster County, in the 1770-71 time frame and then moved to Berks County within a few years.  Since George was a young, single man, and because we can find no arrival record for him, we are working from a hypothesis that (1) he was born in Pennsylvania or (2) came to Pennsylvania as a child with parents.  Since he first appears in Lancaster County, it makes sense to look for parents and relatives there.  Furthermore, since his eldest son was named John, it makes sense to consider that his father may have been a Johannes (John) Weyand/Weiand.

1. Johannes Weiand arrived on the ship Two Brothers in 1748.
2. Johannes (+) Weyant arrived on the ship Richard and Mary in 1752.
3. Johannes Weygandt arrived on the ship John and Elizabeth in 1754.

 
1. Johannes Weiand  who arrived on the ship Two Brothers in1748.

Johannes Weiand, born ca. 1728, arrived on September 15, 1748, on the ship "Two Brothers," and signed his name Johannes Weiand.  
In a Jan 16, 1749 newpaper Johannes Weyand, 20, is reported to have run away from his master in Lancaster.
On September 15, 1751, Mary Magdalena, a daughter child of John Weyan, was baptized at First Reformed Church, Lancaster.  This child was born August 5, 1751.  The sponsor was Magdalena Hennenberger.
Then, on November 23, 1752, it appears that Johannes had moved out of Lancaster up to northwestern Lancaster County. An abstract of a 1783 deed from Valentine Hyde to Christian Herr, recorded in Lancaster County, PA Deed Book U, page 334, indicates that John Viant warranted a tract of land in Mount Joy Township, Lancaster County, Pa., on November 23, 1752.  (The size of this tract is not listed but it was later consolidated with another tract to form 119 acres of land.)  John Wyant sold this land to John Derr, aka John There, on October 30, 1753.  A search of the Lancaster County, PA Warrant Register does not show any evidence of this 1752 warrant, however.  Since it was a grant from the province, recordation was not optional, and it seems impossible that it is not listed.  
The land, 25 acres, was in Donegal Twp - presumably a part that went into Mt Joy Twp. This makes clear that this John is not the one who arrived 1754, but does not prove it is the one who arrived 1748. Two things of interest- the spelling of the name generally with no middle consonant and the fact that he could sign his name.
John Weygand, son of John and Barbara was born Jan 1, 1761 and baptized at the Lancaster 1st Reformed Church. (It is possible that this not the same John but the Hans Weygand who arrived in 1754, whose wife could have been Barbara also. It is interesting that in this instance the spelling is different and that the wife’s maiden name is not given.)
John & Barbara (Henneberger) Weiand seem to have gone to York County:
Anna Maria and Anna Elizabeth b Feb 18, 1763 to Johannes & Barbara Weyand (Henneberger) baptized at First Reformed & Trinity First Reformed, York.
He may have been the John Wyant in Hopewell Twp, York County in 1790.
It is also possible that he returned to Lancaster.
There is no listing in Lancaster Township in 1759.  The tax lists from most of the 1760s are missing but a John Wyland was listed as an inmate (renter of land) in Lancaster Township in 1763, and in 1769 John Wyand was taxed in Lancaster City.
There was a John Weiant on the 1769 assessment of Lancaster Township, Lancaster County.  He was listed with no property.  He was listed on the 1770 assessment too, but the name is crossed out.  As we do not find this person after this date, it is reasonable to presume (at least for now) that he died.

See also notes after Johannes 2.

 

2. Johannes (+) Weyant who arrived on the ship Richard and Mary in 1752.

Another Johannes Weyant immigrated on the ship "Richard and Mary," arriving at Philadelphia on September 26, 1752. He seems to have been illiterate.  He may be the person who settled in Northampton Co.
Johannes Weyant was taxed in Towamensing Township, Northampton County, in 1761, 1762, 1767, 1768 (15 acres clear and 65 acres woods), 1772, 1785, 1786, 1788, and 1790.  Johannes Weyand of Towamensing was mentioned in Christopher Truby's letter of 5 Aug, 1763. and served on the frontier in the Revolutionary War in 1778.  (PA Archives, Series 5, Vol. 8, p. 554-55.  "To cash paid to the following men to serve two months on the frontiers of Northampton County during the late War in pursuance of an Order of the Supreme Executive Council bearing date the 14th day of July 1778. . . . No. 13.  John Vyant.")
John Weiand  warranted and patented two pieces of land in Towamensing in 1784 - Wiantburg and Copenhagen. In 1797 he and wife Elizabeth deeded both properties (Bk C2 pp 448-50) to Stoffel Correll and Modlany Wiond (presumably their daughter and her husband). That is the only document found so far and he signed with a mark. He may have been too incapacitated to sign but if he was Johannes 2 he was illiterate.
In 1790 census John Weiand was listed with 2 males over 16 and 4 females.

A John Weigand signed the oath of allegiance  June 3, 1778.

As seems to be the case so often, even with this uncommon name, there seem to be two Johns at least in this area. One was generally spelled with a middle g and one without. (The family of Cornelius Weygandt who was in Northampton County early had a son John.)

Once again it is also possible that Johannes Weyant 2 stayed in Lancaster.
He was not taxed in Lancaster Township in 1759.  The tax lists from most of the 1760s are missing but a John Wyland was listed as an inmate (renter of land) in Lancaster Township in 1763, and in 1769 John Wyand was taxed in Lancaster City
and there was a John Weiant on the 1769 assessment of Lancaster Township, Lancaster County.  He was listed with no property.  He was listed on the 1770 assessment, but the name is crossed out.  As we do not find this person after this date, it is reasonable to presume (at least for now) that he died. In this scenario John 1 Moved to York County and John 2 stayed in Lancaster.

3. Johannes Weygandt who arrived on the ship John and Elizabeth in 1754.

Johannes Weÿgand(t) arrived in Philadelphia on the ship John and Elizabeth, arriving Nov. 7, 1754. A week later John Weigant warranted a tract of 25 acres in Rapho Township, Lancaster County, on November 14, 1754; the tract was patented to a Michael Keyser on September 5, 1766, as 68.120 acres; the patent was recorded in PA Patent Book AA-8, page 13, and the survey was recorded in PA Survey Book D-16, page 11.
The records of Blaser’s Reformed Church in West Donegal Township, Lancaster County, show the baptisms of Barbara and Anna Maria, on May 19, 1756. They were both daughters of John and Barbara Weigand; Barbara was born in February, 1754; Anna Maria on August 1, 1755.  Barbara’s sponsors were Peter Esch and wife; Anna Maria’s sponsors were Adam Hubele and wife.  Then a son John was born Jan. 1, 1761, and baptized June 14, 1761, at First Reformed Church in Lancaster.
Although Lancaster County was established in 1729, there are no tax assessments before 1751 for any township in the county.  
Hanns Wygand appears in the Donegal Township assessment of 1756, with no property.  He appears there also in 1757, as Jno. Wine, taxed for £0.7.6.  There were two additional tax lists made in 1757, one for the province and one for the King, but he was not listed there.  And he is not on these lists after 1757.  Nor is he listed for Mount Joy Township (see below), which begin in 1759, or Rapho Township.
The area of Donegal Township in the 1750s comprised the present townships of Conoy, West Donegal, Mount Joy, and East Donegal, and the boroughs of Elizabethtown, Marietta, and Mount Joy.  Rapho Township was formed from part of Donegal in 1741, and joined it on the east.  Mount Joy Township was formed out of Donegal in 1759.  Manor Township, just west of Lancaster, where Georg Weiand was married in 1770 was only a short distance south of Donegal Township in those years.  Also of interest, this area forms the northwestern border of Lancaster County.  It borders Londonderry and Conewago Townships in Dauphin County, York County, and Lebanon County.  Before 1785, Dauphin and Lebanon Counties were both part of Lancaster County. In York County, Hellam, Lower Windsor, and Chanceford Townships border Lancaster County, but these are separated by the Susquehanna River, so it was a little more difficult to move back and forth in that direction (but certainly not impossible).

 



Here are my thoughts on three Johanneses who arrived in Philadelphia around the time that our Georg would have been a boy.
1. Johannes Weiand arrived on the ship Two Brothers in 1748
2. Johannes (+) Weyant arrived on the ship Richard and Mary in 1752
3. Johannes Weygandt arrived on the ship John and Elizabeth in 1754

Our George signed his name in German script. While it is not impossible, I doubt that his father would not also have been able to write. So I would eliminate 2.

Our George signed his name Weiand so it seems unlikely that his father would have signed Weygandt so I eliminate 3.

The problem with 1 is only age. In a Jan 16, 1749 newpaper Johannes Weyand, 20, is reported to have run away from his master in Lancaster. This seems to fit very well with a young man (born about 1728) who had arrived a few months earlier and was paying off his fare. There is no record to say whether or not he (was) returned to his "owner."
Our George married in 1770. His wife, according to her tombstone, was 22 at the time. I would expect her husband to be older, making his birth year before 1748, the year Johannes 1 arrived. (However, he certainly could have been younger than his wife - census records only seem to place his birth between 1745 and 1750.) These arrival lists do not mention family, though clearly not all passengers were single. It is possible this 19 yr old arrived married and with a son, but it seems unlikely. And a servant running away suggests a single man, not one with a family.
All in all, it seems that if Johannes 1 is our ancestor he married in PA and had George 1749/50.
If Georg, seemingly a practicing Lutheran, grew up in Lancaster County, why is there no record of him in the church where he was married and had his son baptized, where the pastor appears to be unfamiliar with his family name?

Two remaining options can't be forgotten.
1. George's father was not Johannes, though there are not many candidates in the Lancaster area.
2. He arrived as a young adult but the record is lost (and his father could still be a Johannes in Germany). It is equally possible that the arrival of a 4th Johannes has been lost.
            

 

            

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